Expert Warned That Mad Cow Was Imminent
By SANDRA BLAKESLEE

<http://www.nytimes.com/2003/12/25/national/25WARN.html>

Published: December 25, 2003

Ever since he identified the bizarre brain-destroying
proteins that cause mad cow disease, Dr. Stanley
Prusiner, a neurologist at the University of California
at San Francisco, has worried about whether the meat
supply in America is safe.

He spoke over the years of the need to increase testing
and safety measures. Then in May, a case of mad cow
disease appeared in Canada, and he quickly sought a
meeting with Ann M. Veneman, the secretary of
agriculture. He was rebuffed, he said in an interview
yesterday, until he ran into Karl Rove, senior adviser
to President Bush.

So six weeks ago, Dr. Prusiner, who won the 1997 Nobel
Prize in Medicine for his work on prions, entered Ms.
Veneman's office with a message. "I went to tell her
that what happened in Canada was going to happen in the
United States," Dr. Prusiner said. "I told her it was
just a matter of time."

The department had been willfully blind to the threat,
he said. The only reason mad cow disease had not been
found here, he said, is that the department's animal
inspection agency was testing too few animals. Once more
cows are tested, he added, "we'll be able to understand
the magnitude of our problem."

This nation should immediately start testing every cow
that shows signs of illness and eventually every single
cow upon slaughter, he said he told Ms. Veneman. Japan
has such a program and is finding the disease in young
asymptomatic animals.

Fast, accurate and inexpensive tests are available, Dr.
Prusiner said, including one that he has patented
through his university.

Ms. Veneman's response (he said she did not share his
sense of urgency) left him frustrated. That frustration
soared this week after a cow in Washington State was
tentatively found to have the disease. If the nation had
increased testing and inspections, meat from that cow
might never have entered the food chain, he said.

Ms. Veneman was not available for interviews yesterday,
and the White House referred all questions to the
department. A spokeswoman for Ms. Veneman, Julie Quick,
said: "We have met with many experts in this area,
including Dr. Prusiner. We welcome as much scientific
input and insight as we can get on this very important
issue. We want to make sure that our actions are based
on the best available science."

In Dr. Prusiner's view, Ms. Veneman is getting poor
scientific advice. "U.S.D.A. scientists and
veterinarians, who grew up learning about viruses, have
difficulty comprehending the novel concepts of prion
biology," he said. "They treat the disease as if it were
an infection that you can contain by quarantining
animals on farms. It's as though my work of the last 20
years did not exist."

Scientists have long been fascinated by a group of
diseases, called spongiform encephalopathies, that eat
away at the brain, causing madness and death. The
leading theory was that they were caused by a slow-
acting virus. But in 1988, Dr. Prusiner proposed a
theory that seemed heretical at the time: the infectious
agent was simply a type of protein, which he called
prions.

Prions (pronounced PREE-ons), he and others went on to
establish, are proteins that as a matter of course can
misfold - that is, fold themselves into alternative
shapes that have lethal properties - and cause a runaway
reaction in nervous tissue. As more misfolded proteins
accumulate, they kill nerve cells.

Animals that eat infected tissues can contract the
disease, setting off an epidemic as animals eat each
other via rendered meats. But misfolded proteins can
also arise spontaneously in cattle and other animals,
Dr. Prusiner said. It is not known whether meat from
animals with that form of the disease could pass the
disease to humans, he said, but it is a risk that
greatly worries him.

Cattle with sporadic disease are probably entering the
food chain in the United States in small numbers, Dr.
Prusiner and other experts say.

Brain tissue from the newly discovered dairy cow in
Washington is now being tested in Britain to see if it
matches prion strains that caused the mad cow epidemic
there, or if it is a homegrown American sporadic strain,
Dr. Prusiner said.

"The problem is we just don't know the size of the
problem," he said. "We don't know the prevalence or
incidence of the disease."

The Japanese experience is instructive, Dr. Prusiner
said. Three and a half years ago, that country
identified its first case of mad cow disease. The
government then said it would begin testing all cows
older than 30 months, as they do in Europe. Older
animals presumably have a greater chance of showing the
disease, Dr. Prusiner said.

Japanese consumer groups protested and the government
then said it would test every cow upon slaughter, Dr.
Prusiner said. The Japanese have 4 million cattle and
slaughter 1.2 million of them each year. The United
States has 100 million cattle and kills 35 million a
year.

Early this fall, Japanese surveillance found two new
cases of the disease in young animals, aged 21 and 23
months. "Under no testing regime except Japan would
these cases ever be found," he said.

The 23-month-old cow tested borderline positive using
two traditional tests. But the surveillance team then
looked in a different part of the brain using an
advanced research technique and found a huge signal for
infectious material, Dr. Prusiner said. It was a
different strain of the disease, possibly a sporadic
case.

The only way to learn what the United States is facing
is to test every animal, Dr. Prusiner said. Existing
methods, used widely in Europe and Japan, grind up brain
stem tissue and use an enzyme to measure amounts of
infectious prions. Animals must have lots of bad prions
to get a clear diagnosis.

Newer tests, by a variety of companies, are more
sensitive, cheaper and faster. Dr. Prusiner said that
his test could even detect extremely small amounts of
infectious prion in very young animals with no symptoms.
Sold by InPro Biotechnology in South San Francisco, a
single testing operation could process 8,000 samples in
24 hours, he said.

British health officials will start using the test in
February, Dr. Prusiner said. If adopted in this country,
it would raise the price of a pound of meat by two to
three cents, he said.

"We want to keep prions out of the mouths of humans,"
Dr. Prusiner said. "We don't know what they might be
doing to us."

His laboratory is working on promising treatments for
the human form of mad cow disease but preventing its
spread is just as important, he said. "Science is
capable of finding out how serious the problem is," he
said, "but only government can mandate the solutions."

===============================================================

Murdoch's Mega-Media Merger
By David Sirota, Christy Harvey and Judd Legum
The Progress Report 

Monday 22 December 2003 

In a devastating blow for media diversity, the FCC, on a contentious 3 to 2 vote, approved a "$6.6
billion media mega merger" between DirecTV satellite television service and Rupert Murdoch's News
Corporation. The merger will add DirecTV's 11 million subscriber to Murdoch's U.S. empire which
already includes local television stations reaching more than 44 percent of the country, a major
national broadcast network, numerous cable and satellite channels, the most widely used electronic
program guide, newspapers, magazines, a publishing house and movie studios. The unprecedented
size and scope of Murdoch's holding will, according to FCC Commission Jonathan A. Adelstein, put
News Corp. "in a position to raise programming prices for consumers, harm competition in video
programming and distribution markets nationwide, and decrease the diversity of media ownership." 

The FCC-approved deal allows News Corp. to effectively shut out local programming -- especially in
rural markets. Although News Corp. initially pledged to provide local television stations to satellite
subscribers, they later revealed that they intended to do so by incorporating conventional antennas into
its devices and "hope the customer can receive a signal." For people who live in rural areas, that will
frequently mean they receive no signal at all. Commissioner Adelstein says that News Corp's position
means that "what could have been the most important public interest benefit of this merger turns out to
be nothing more than a sham." 

News Corp. owns a vast array of television outlets, including many which feature highly coveted
regional sports programming. The acquisition of DirecTV will give News Corp even more bargaining
clout when it negotiates retransmission fees with cable and satellite competitors. Even the FCC
recognized that this was a problem. In approving the merger, the FCC required that "its Fox subsidiary
offer its programming to other cable and satellite operators on the same terms as it does to DirecTV."
The FCC also required that News Corp. accept "arbitration of any disputes" and must continue to
provide programming while the dispute is being resolved. One problem: "the benefits of these
conditions disappear without a trace after six years." 

When News Corp. pitched the merger to the FCC it claimed that the merger "will give them the
scale and scope to compete more effectively." But News Corp. failed to "demonstrate that any of these
alleged savings would be passed on to consumers nor did they evince great enthusiasm for doing so."
News Corp. produced very little data as to how the transaction "could possibly discipline rising cable
rates." FCC Commissioner Michael J. Copps said the likelihood News Corp's acquisition of DirecTV
would lower prices for consumers "is so remote as to be invisible." 

Ever wonder how Murdoch usually gets what he wants? News Corp. spent nearly $10 million on
lobbying from 1999 to 2002. Murdoch himself has met personally with FCC commissioners and key
lawmakers several times. For the 2004 election, News Corp. has already contributed $200,000. For the
2000 and 2002 cycles the company's contributions exceeded $1.7 million dollars. 

================================================================

Countries Ban American Beef After First Mad Cow Case
By Matthew L. Wald and Eric Lichtblau
The New York Times 

Wednesday 24 December 2003 

WASHINGTON, Dec. 23 — A sick cow slaughtered about two weeks ago near Yakima, Wash.,
has tested positive for mad cow disease in early laboratory results, the first such case in the United
States, the secretary of agriculture said on Tuesday. 

Shortly after the announcement, Japan said it was banning imports of American beef. The South
Korean agriculture ministry said in a statement that South Korea was also halting American beef
imports and that it was pulling American beef products off supermarket shelves. 

[On Wednesday morning, Russia, Thailand and Hong Kong also announced that they too were
banning imports of American beef products.] 

American agriculture officials are likely to announce as early as Wednesday a voluntary recall on
beef they hope to trace to the plants where the cow was slaughtered and processed, said Dr. Elsa
Murano, the under secretary for food safety. 

"We are considering if we need to take that step, but it's likely to happen," Dr. Murano said in an
interview. 

Federal officials did not say where the meat is now, but the agriculture secretary, Ann M.
Veneman, said the meat supply was safe because of precautions taken over the last decade to keep
the nerve tissue of slaughtered beef out of the food supply. Only the brain, spinal cord and related parts
can spread the disease to humans, Ms. Veneman said, and she added that she intended to serve beef
to her family at Christmas. 

"This finding, while unfortunate, does not pose any kind of significant risk to the human food chain,"
she said at a news briefing here tonight. 

While agriculture officials urged the public not to overreact to the discovery, Dr. W. Ron DeHaven,
the chief veterinary officer for the Agriculture Department, said: "This is certainly a big concern. We
now have evidence of a disease that we didn't have before in the U.S." 

Agriculture officials and leaders of the beef industry were particularly concerned about the impact
on domestic sales and beef exports. They are eager to avoid a repetition of the crisis that hit Europe in
the 1980's and 1990's. Mad cow disease was first diagnosed in Britian in 1986. It spread through
180,000 livestock, led to the deaths of more than 100 people and prompted the United States and other
countries to ban beef imports. 

In May, when a single case of mad cow disease, known formally as bovine spongiform
encephalopathy, was found in Alberta, Canada, a number of countries, including the United States,
banned the import of Canadian beef. The ban has been eased somewhat, and imports of boneless cuts
and from cattle younger than 30 months have resumed. 

No cases have turned up in people from the Canadian beef. 

Federal officials say the cow in the Washington case, a Holstein, was traced to a farm in Mabton,
about 40 miles southeast of Yakima. The farm has been quarantined, Dr. Veneman said. 

The sample was taken on Dec. 9, the same day the cow was slaughtered. Inspectors took a
sample because the cow was a "downer animal," which Ms. Veneman said meant "nonambulatory." A
fraction of all cows that cannot walk — a symptom of the disease — are tested. 

Nerve tissue from the cow was tested at a government laboratory in Ames, Iowa, establishing a
"presumptive" diagnosis, she said, and a military jet is flying a sample to a laboratory in England for a
definitive diagnosis. No result is expected for several days, but the government was proceeding as if
the finding was conclusive, she said. 

The development is likely to be a serious blow for ranchers, feed-lot operators and slaughterhouses.
About 10 percent of American beef production is exported, industry officials say. 

McDonald's, Burger King and Wal-Mart Stores quickly said they did not believe they had received
meat from the animal. And almost as soon as Ms. Veneman finished her news conference, officials of
the National Cattlemen's Beef Association began a conference call to seek to reassure consumers.
Terry Stokes, chief executive of the group, referred to a "triple firewall" to prevent the introduction or
spread of the disease. 


Go to Original 

Inspections for Mad Cow Lag Those Done Abroad
By Marian Burros and Donald G. McNeil Jr.
The New York Times 

Wednesday 24 December 2003 

In discussing the case of mad cow disease apparently found in Washington State, Secretary of
Agriculture Ann M. Veneman said yesterday that her department tested 20,526 cattle for mad cow
disease last year. But that is only a small percentage of the 35 million commercially slaughtered each
year. 

Because no domestic cases of mad cow disease have been found before, the United States has
never put in place the kind of stringent testing done in Japan and some European countries, where
every animal is supposed to be tested before humans can eat it. 

Inspectors are supposed to view cattle outside slaughterhouses and weed out any having trouble
walking. Those with signs of brain disease are to be ruled unfit for human consumption and sent to a
rendering plant. 

That appears to have happened with the Washington cow. Yesterday, Elsa Murano, under
secretary of agriculture for food safety, said its brain and spinal column had been sent to such a plant,
to be turned into protein feed, oils and other products. It is the brain and spinal cord that are the most
likely to be infected with prions, the misfolded proteins that can lead to a mad-cow-like disease in
humans. 

This does not guarantee that infected matter will never make its way into the human food supply,
critics noted yesterday. 

Under Food and Drug Administration regulations issued in 1997, it is illegal to feed protein made
from cows, sheep, deer and other so-called ruminants to other ruminants. But it is still legal to feed the
rendered protein to pigs, chickens and other animals. Those animals in turn can be rendered and fed to
cows or sheep. Also, beef blood and beef fat can be fed to calves. 

"You can go into any feed store and buy Calf Starter or calf milk substitute," said John Stauber,
co-author of "Mad Cow U.S.A.," a 1997 book that warned that the disease could reach this country.
"We're weaning calves on cattle blood proteins, even though we know blood plasma can carry the
disease." 

Also, said Sheldon Rampton, Mr. Stauber's co-author, questions have been raised about how
effective the F.D.A. bans on feeding across species are. 

If an animal becomes infected, the incubation period of the disease is three to eight years, so the
detection of one animal with the disease suggests that others may have been infected by the same
source but have not yet been found. 

Mr. Stauber said an F.D.A. memorandum in 1997 predicted that if a single case of encephalopathy
was found in the United States and a total ban on all feeding of animal protein to animals was
immediately enacted, it was still possible that as many as 299,000 infected cows would be found over
the next 11 years. 

In the past, the hooves and horns were used for gelatins and bone and blood meal as fertilizer and
the fat became soap. But with the invention of chemical soaps and fertilizers in the 1960's, other uses
had to be found for the waste, and the animal protein market developed as a cheap way to bulk up
animals. 

Feed plants are inspected by the F.D.A., not the Department of Agriculture. In 2001, the F.D.A.
was so short of inspectors that nearly a third of the country's 10,000 feed plants were not inspected. 

=================================================================

9/11 Families Reject 'Bribe,' Sue U.S.
By Tim Harper
Toronto Star 

Tuesday 23 December 2003 

Families sue U.S., reject 9/11 `bribe', ignore deadline for compensation. Payouts
average $1.8 million.

WASHINGTON—For some, it's blood money, a repugnant payoff they feel they have no choice but
to accept. 

For a handful of others, the process of claiming compensation is too painful: they find themselves
paralyzed by grief and unable to reopen emotional wounds barely healed from the deaths of their loved
ones in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. 

But as many as 73 families see the process of U.S. government compensation as an attempt to
protect those who should be held accountable for what they believe was mass murder. 

They ignored a midnight deadline last night, their last chance to apply for government cash. 

And today, they begin a new stage in an arduous odyssey and will sue their government, airlines
and state and local authorities. 

"This may be uncharted waters, but I was thrown in a pool on Sept. 11, 2001 and had to learn to
swim," said Monica Gabrielle, who lost her husband Richard in the World Trade Center attack. 

"I am doing this for my husband. He was a gentle man, and he was alive, trying to get out of that
building that day. The dead. The dying. The smoke. The terror. No one should have suffered like that. I
want accountability. I need answers." 

The compensation fund has been controversial since President George W. Bush signed it into law
13 days after the attacks. For those who lost family members, it was always about protecting airlines,
federal, state and local authorities from billions of dollars of lawsuits. 

To receive the federal money, recipients must sign a waiver giving up their right to sue anyone
involved in the worst terrorist attacks in U.S. history. 

A late surge of claims on deadline yesterday meant close to 95 per cent of the 2,976 families who
lost loved ones in New York, Washington and Pennsylvania were expected to finally take the money. 

To get there, they had to accept a monetary value on the lives of those closest to them, after
making a case based on birth and marriage licences, diplomas and degrees, even videos. They will, on
average, receive $1.8 million (all figures U.S.) each. 

Families of 24 Canadian victims are eligible for compensation and most have applied. 

Brian Alexander, a New York lawyer representing a portion of the victims who have launched the
lawsuit, said he knew of no Canadians involved. 

He said those who have chosen to sue have put no dollar figure on awards and each claim will be
individually tailored. 

"A widow who is 80 years old is not in the same category as a widow who lost her husband at age
30 and has four kids at home," he said. 

Some $1.5 billion had been paid from the government fund by the weekend. Compensation for
individual deaths has ranged from $250,000 to $6.9 million. Those physically injured as a result of the
attacks have received compensation ranging from $500 to $7.9 million. 

"Only in America could there be a program like this," fund administrator Kenneth Feinberg told CNN
yesterday. 

"You wouldn't find a program paying an average $1.8 million tax-free to eligible families. This is an
unprecedented, unique program and exhibits I think the best in the American people." 

Yet Gabrielle says it is a bribe by the government so victims can be coerced into washing their
hands of the affair. 

She is also resentful that the government is determining the worth of loved ones. 

"This is about mass murder," she said. "I want to know who was responsible. 

"No one has been fired. No one has been demoted. The same people who are guarding us today on
an elevated security alert are the same people who were working that day." 

Gabrielle said she is looking at a special 9/11 commission headed by former New Jersey governor
Thomas Kean to answer the question of responsibility. 

Kean has battled the White House, New York and aviation authorities for access to documents. He
has a May deadline. 

"There are people that, if I was doing the job, would certainly not be in the position they were in at
that time because they failed. They simply failed," Kean told CBS last week. 

He said later he was talking of lower level officials, but Gabrielle and others want to know more
about the safety of the buildings and airport security. 

Even those who have accepted the money see it only as the lesser of two evils. 

Irene Golinski, 53, whose husband died in the Pentagon attack, was still grappling with the decision
to put 9/11 behind her or continue with a lawsuit. 

"It's almost like it's a payoff to save the airlines and not hold any of those people responsible for
what happened," she said. 

Feinberg's office detailed some awards. The beneficiary of a 36-year-old project manager earning
$231,000 and with one dependent was paid $3.48 million, while the beneficiary of a 26-year-old military
officer with no dependents and a $44,000 salary got $1.84 million. 

===============================================================

Rense.com


http://www.rense.com/general6/cow.htm

Mad Cow/CJD - Staggering List 
Of Products Made From Cattle
By Jeff Rense
12-24-00


In light of the potentially catastrophic spread of Mad Cow/nvCJD
prions worldwide (UN WHO statement) throughout the food chain
and environment, and my continuing call for completely new,
mandatory universal medical/dental sterilization protocols - including
the absolute cessation of the reuse of all invasive instruments and
equipment - this incredible list will come as quite a surprise to many. 

I've broken most of the items down into Medical, Food, and
General/Industrial categories to facilitate a grasp of the enormity of
the use of animal products in our lives and the potential vectors of
Mad Cow/CJD prions. This categorization is not necessarily
complete; there are some consumables which are not listed in FOOD,
for example, but the general point of the list is simple: just because
one doesn't eat meat or dairy, doesn't mean one is necessarily safe
from potential exposure to Mad Cow prions and
contaminated/infected products from cattle. 

With the recent discovery in the UK that tonsils of BSE/TSE
infected individuals contain the Mad Cow/CJD killer prions, one
wonders if other body tissues might be similar repositories. One also
ponders the ongoing and bizarre issue of mass cattle and other animal
mutilations and wonders whether this is some kind of monitoring
process to track the spread of environmental decay and toxicity...and
prion diseases. 

From anti-aging creams to surgical sutures to chocolate milkshakes
and marshmallows...we have injected animal products from cattle,
sheep, and hogs into nearly every corner of our lives. Behold... 

GENERAL MEDICAL & HEALTH CARE PRODUCTS 

antibodies (immunoglobins) 
beef insulin 
bovine collagen - used as injections to fill in scars 
bovine fibrinolysin (brand name- Elase) ointment for necrotic tissue 
bovine super oxide - dismutase cream (Orgotein) - cosmetic skin
cream to 
prevent tissue aging. 
bovine thrombin (brand name- Thrombinar) clotting agent for blood 
culture medium - diagnosis 
fetal bovine serum - tissue cultures 
Hyaluronidase - efficient drug use 
PTH - control tetany 
pegademase - bovine derivative (brand name- Adagen) 
- for patients who are immuno-compromised...helps prevent 
white blood cells from breaking down. 
pill capsules - GELATIN 
whole serum - vaccine manufacturing 

PRODUCTS FROM OVARIES 
estrogen 
progesterone - a reproductive hormone 

PRODUCT FROM STOMACHS 
pepsin - aid in protein digestion 
rennet - aid in milk digestion 

PRODUCTS FROM THYROIDS 
bovine thyroid (Thyrar) a thyroid replacement 
TSH - thyroid diagnosis 
thyroid extract - hypothrodism 
thyroid hormones 
myxedema 
cretinism 

PRODUCTS FROM ADRENALS 
cortisone - for arthritis, skin allergies, anti-inflammatory medicine 
epinephrine - aid in raising blood pressure, heart disorders, and
allergies 

PRODUCTS FROM LIVERS 
heparin - anti-coagulant, prevents gangrene 
liver extract - treatment of anemia 
intrinsic factor - pernicious anemia 
Vitamin B12 - prevention of B-complex deficiencies 

PRODUCTS FROM LUNGS 
heparin - anti-coagulant, prevents gangrene 

PRODUCTS FROM BLOOD 
plasma protein 
blood albumin - RH factor typing 
Fraction I - hemophilia 
Fraction V - kills viruses 
iron for anemia 
thrombin - blood coagulant 
protein extracts 
diagnostic microbiology 

PRODUCTS FROM HOG HEARTS 
heart valves for human transplant 

PRODUCTS FROM INTESTINES 
medical sutures - surgery 

PRODUCTS FROM BONES 
bone marrow - blood disorders 
bone meal - calcium and phosphorous source 
mineral source in supplements 
collagen and bone for plastic surgery 
soft cartilage - plastic surgery 
xiphisternal cartilage (breastbone) plastic surgery 

PRODUCTS FROM PANCREAS 
chymotrypsin - contact surgery 
diastase - aid in starch digestion 
glucagon - treat hypoglycemia 
insulin - diabetes mellitus 
pancreatin - aid digestion 
trypsin - for burns, wounds, and infection - promotes healing - aid in 
protein 
digestion and in cleaning wounds 

PRODUCTS FROM PITUITARY GLANDS 
ACTH - arthritis, allergies, rheumatic fever, skin and eye
inflammations 
pressor hormone - regulates blood pressure 
prolactin - promotes lactation 
vasopressin - controls intestinal and renal functions 

PRODUCTS FROM SPINAL CORDS 
cholesterol - hormone products 

OTHER MEDICAL AND HEALTH CARE PRODUCTS 
nitroglycerine 
antibodies (immunoglobins) 
beef insulin 
bovine collagen - used as injections to fill in scars 
bovine fibrinolysin (Elase - brand name) ointment for use on necrotic
tissue 
bovine super oxide - dismutase cream (Orgotein) - cosmetic skin
cream to 
prevent tissue aging 
bovine thrombin (Thrombinar - brand name) clotting agent for blood 
culture medium - diagnosis 
fetal bovine serum - tissue cultures 
Hyaluronidase - efficient drug use 
PTH - control tetany 
pegademase - bovine derivative (Adagen - brand name) - 
- for patients who are immuno-compromised 
- helps prevent white blood cells from breaking down. 
pill capsules - GELATIN 
whole serum - vaccine manufacturing 


*** GENERAL FOOD PRODUCTS *** 

PRODUCTS FROM CATTLE, SHEEP, HOG FLESH 
a huge variety of fresh, frozen, and pre-cooked meats 
and prepared and processed meat products 

PRODUCTS FROM MILK/DAIRY 
butter 
casein (proteins) 
cheese and cheese products 
cream 
food ethanol 
ice cream and ice cream mixes 
lactose (carbohydrates) 
milk powder 
sherbet 
whey (proteins) 
fats (lipids) 
yogurt 

PRODUCTS FROM FATS AND FATTY ACIDS (edible) 
chewing gum 
lard 
oleo margarine 
oleo shortening 
oleostearin 
pharmaceuticals 
rennet for cheese (sheep) 
rennet for cheese (sheep) 
shortening 

PRODUCTS FROM BLOOD 
blood sausage 
bone meal 
cake mixes 
deep-fry batters 
egg substitute 
gravy mixes 
imitation seafood 
pasta 
whipped toppings and coffee whiteners 

PRODUCTS FROM BONES 
whitener in refined sugar 

PRODUCTS FROM BONE, HORNS, AND HOOVES 
gelatin capsules 
gelatin deserts 
ice cream, malts and shakes 
marshmallow 
potted meats 

PRODUCTS FROM INTESTINES 
sausage casings 

PRODUCTS FROM HIDES and SKINS 
sausage casings 
gelatin 
candies and confectionery 
flavorings 
foods 
gelatin desserts 
ice cream 
marshmallows 
mayonnaise 
yogurt 


*** INDUSTRIAL AND CONSUMER PRODUCTS *** 

PRODUCTS FROM MILK 
adhesives 
animal feed 
buttons 
carriers for human medicine 
cosmetics 
glue 
pharmaceuticals 
sizing 
specialty plastics 
veterinary medicines 

PRODUCTS FROM BLOOD 
adhesives 
bone marrow 
bone meal 
fabric printing and dyeing 
leather-treating agents 
livestock feed 
minerals 
plaster retardant 
plywood adhesive 
diagnostic microbiology 
from colloidal proteins - glue for automobile bodies 
protein source in feeds 
sticking agent 
textile sizing 

PRODUCTS FROM BONES 
bone charcoal 
pencils 
high grade steel 
bone handles 
bone jewelry 
mineral source in feed 
fertilizer 
dried bones 
buttons 
bone china 
glass 
porcelain enamel 
water filters 
whitener in refined sugar 

PRODUCTS FROM BONE, HORNS, AND HOOVES 
adhesives 
bandage strips 
collagen cold cream 
cellophane wrap and tape 
crochet needles 
dice 
dog biscuits 
emery boards and cloth 
fertilizer 
glycerine 
laminated wood products 
neatsfoot oil 
photographic film 
plywood and paneling 
shampoo and conditioner 
wallpaper and wallpaper paste 
syringes 

PRODUCTS FROM BRAINS 
anti-aging cream 
cholesterol 

PRODUCTS FROM FATS AND FATTY ACIDS (edible and
inedible) 
animal foods 
biodegradable detergents 
biodiesel 
cellophane 
cement 
ceramics 
chalk 
chemicals 
cosmetics 
crayons 
creams and lotions (sheep) 
deodorants 
detergents 
explosives 
fertilizer 
fiber softeners 
floor wax 
glycerin 
glycerol 
antifreeze 
herbicides 
horse and livestock feeds 
industrial oils and lubricants 
insecticides 
insulation 
linoleum 
livestock feed 
lubricants 
makeup 
matches 
medicines 
mink oil 
nitroglycerine 
oil polishes 
ointment bases 
oleostearin 
paints 
paraffin 
perfumes 
pet foods 
pharmaceuticals 
plasticizers 
plastics 
printing rollers 
protein hair conditioner 
protein hair shampoo 
putty 
rubber products 
shaving cream 
shoe cream 
soaps 
solvents 
stearic acid (sheep) 
tallow for tanning 
textiles 
tires 
water proofing agents 
weed killers 

PRODUCTS FROM GALLSTONES 
ornaments 

PRODUCTS FROM HAIR 
air filters 
artist's paint brush 
felt and rug padding 
insulation material 
non-wovens 
plastering material 
textiles 
upholstering material 

PRODUCTS FROM HIDES and SKINS 
belts 
collagen-based adhesives (from trimmings) 
bandages 
emery boards 
glues -for papermaking, bookbinding, cabinetmaking 
sheetrock 
wallpaper 
drum head (sheep) 
pharmaceuticals 
photographic materials 
leather sporting goods 
leather wearing apparel 
luggage 
pigskin garments, gloves, and shoes 
porcine burn dressings for burn victims 
shoes and boots 
upholstery 
wallets 

PRODUCTS FROM HOOVES AND HORNS 
chessmen 
combs 
buttons 
fertilizer 
horn handles 
imitation ivory 
inedible bone meal 
livestock feeds 
ornaments 
piano keys 
plant food 

PRODUCTS FROM INTESTINES 
instrument strings 
sausage casings 
tennis racquet strings 

PRODUCTS FROM MANURE 
fertilizer - used in gardens, lawns and farm cropland 
nitrogen 
potash 
phosphorus 
minor minerals 

OTHER PRODUCTS FROM CATTLE SOURCES 
airplane lubricants and runway foam 
car polishes and waxes 
hydraulic brake fluid 
Stearic acid - helps rubber in tires hold shape under steady surface 
friction 
steel ball bearings containing bone charcoal 
textiles for car upholstery 
various machine oils and viscous fluids 

PRODUCTS FROM WOOL 
asphalt binder 
carpet 
clothing 
cosmetics 
fabrics 
felt 
insulation 
lanolin 
medical ointments 
paint and plaster binder 
pelt products 
rouge base 
rug pads 
upholstery 
woolen goods 
worsted fabric 
yarns 

============================================================

Egyptian Relics Moving By 
Themselves In Museum
Spooky Mystery At Bergen Museum
By Jonathan Tisdall
Aftenposten English Web Desk
12-17-3

Ancient Egyptian shabti - funerary figures that represent servants in the
afterlife - are causing unease for those working at Bergen Museum.
Professor Henrik von Achen says colleagues don't like working there at
night, and the figures appear to be moving in their glass cases, newspaper
Bergens Tidende reports. 

BT reporters toured the museum one dark evening and found the Egyptian
exhibit disguised a few creepy tales. 

"They have behaved strangely since we took them up out of the cellar in
2001," said museum guard Richard Saure. He was the first to notice that
small stone figurines, whose job was to work for the dead, were not like
other relics. 

"They were neatly packed in a case when we brought them up. When we
came to work the day after, they were lying all over the place, except for
two - two false shabtis," Saure said. 

"The exhibition opened in May 2001. Since then these small figurines have
moved. Some of them have turned 90 degrees. They stand in glass cases
that are sealed and locked but you can see it in the trails in the dust," Saure
said. 

"I'm a skeptic, but I have to believe what I see. I don't understand this. If it
is because of vibrations in the floor, like some claim, why don't other
objects move?" the guard wondered. 
Professor von Achen has nothing to add to dampen the mystery. 

"Someone has made them and laid them in a grave. Now they are out of the
grave's darkness. What do they bring? If we ask, maybe they answer, that
is the magic of the museum," von Achen said.

http://www.aftenposten.no/english/local/article.jhtml?articleID=693418